Core Curriculum

9th Grade (Class of 2019)

 

New Tech Institute: Freshmen Courses 2015-16
Required:

English 9A
English 9, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English Language Arts in Grade 9 and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and argumentative/persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

US History
United States History is a two-semester course that builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of U.S. History and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation, students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.

Biology I

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

Principles of Engineering

Principles of Engineering is a course that focuses on the process of applying engineering, technological, scientific and mathematical principles in the design, production, and operation of products, structures, and systems. This is a hands-on course designed to provide students interested in engineering careers to explore experiences related to specialized fields such as civil, mechanical, and materials engineering. Students will engage in research, development, planning, design, production, and project management to simulate a career in engineering. The topics of ethics and the impacts of engineering decisions are also addressed. Classroom activities are organized to allow students to work in teams and use modern technological processes, computers, CAD software, and production systems in developing and presenting solutions to engineering problems. NOTE: Use of the PLTW Course number is limited to schools that have agreed to be part of the Project Lead the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements.

Physical Education I & II (taught outside school day, students complete activity log)
Physical Education I focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum which provide students with opportunities to actively participate in at least four of the following: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all which are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11.

Math Courses
Algebra I
Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relations and Functions; Linear Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Nonlinear Equations; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; and Polynomial Expressions. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Geometry Honors
Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Congruency and Similarity; Measurement; Analytic Geometry; Circles; and Polyhedra. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school INCC The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. 

Algebra II Honors
Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and allows for students to extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. 

Electives
Spanish I
Spanish I, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, introduces students to effective strategies for beginning Spanish language learning, and to various aspects of Spanish-speaking culture. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to basic requests and questions, understand and use appropriate greetings and forms of address, participate in brief guided conversations on familiar topics, and write short passages with guidance. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as reading isolated words and phrases in a situational context and comprehending brief written or oral directions. Additionally, students will examine the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; recognize basic routine practices of the target culture; and recognize and use situation-appropriate non-verbal communication. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom.

Spanish II
Spanish II, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages, builds upon effective strategies for Spanish language learning by encouraging the use of the language and cultural understanding for self-directed purposes. This course encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in expanded contexts, participate independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write cohesive passages with greater independence and using appropriate formats. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and comprehending longer written or oral directions. Students will address the presentational mode by presenting prepared material on a variety of topics, as well as reading aloud to practice appropriate pronunciation and intonation. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and perspectives of Spanish-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course further emphasizes making connections across content areas and the application of understanding Spanish language and culture outside of the classroom. 

Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics 
Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics is a course that specializes in how people use modern manufacturing systems with an introduction to advanced manufacturing and logistics and their relationship to society, individuals, and the environment. Students apply the skills and knowledge of using modern manufacturing processes to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials, industrial products and consumer products Students investigate the properties of engineered materials such as: metallics; polymers; ceramics; and composites. Students study six major types of material processes: casting and molding; forming; separating; conditioning; finishing; and assembling. After gaining a working knowledge of these materials, Students are introduce to advanced manufacturing, logistics, and business principles that are utilized in today’s advanced manufacturing industry. Students gain a basic understanding of tooling, electrical skills, operation skills, inventory principles, MSDS’s, chart and graph reading and MSSC concepts. There is also an emphasis placed on the flow process principles, material movement, safety, and related business operations. Students have the opportunity to develop the characteristics employers seek as well as skills that will help them in future endeavors.

See The Science
Advanced Science, Special Topics is any science course which is grounded in extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations into one or more specialized science disciplines, such as anatomy/physiology, astronomy, biochemistry, botany, ecology, electromagnetism, genetics, geology, nuclear physics, organic chemistry, etc. Students enrolled in this course engage in an in-depth study of the application of science concepts, principles, and unifying themes that are unique to that particular science discipline and that address specific technological, environmental or health-related issues. Under the direction of a science advisor, students enrolled in this course will complete an end-of-course project and presentation, such as a scientific research paper or science fair project, integrating knowledge, skills, and concepts from the student’s course of study. Individual projects are preferred, but group projects may be appropriate if each student in the group has specific and unique responsibilities. Students complete at least one science-themed educational video presentation per semester, with an intended audience of high school science students. Topics of the video can encompass any branch of science. Chronicling of local scientific phenomena and attractions are ideal.

Composition
Composition, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts, is a study and application of the rhetorical writing strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasion. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing, and style. Students read classic and contemporary literature or articles and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students write a variety of types of compositions with a focus on fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and responses to literature.

Creative Writing
Composition, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts, is a study and application of the rhetorical writing strategies for prose and poetry. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, the nuances of language and vocabulary, English language conventions, an awareness of the audience, the purposes for writing, and the style of their own writing. CREATIVE WRITING PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as a short story, a narrative or epic poem, a persuasive speech or letter, a book review, a script or short play, or other creative compositions, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and writing progress in the Creative Writing course content.

Advanced Environmental Science (Environmental Science in State of Indiana Course List)
Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary course that integrates biology, earth science, chemistry, and other disciplines. Students enrolled in this course conduct in-depth scientific studies of ecosystems, population dynamics, resource management, and environmental consequences of natural and anthropogenic processes. Students formulate, design, and carry out laboratory and field investigations as an essential course component. Students completing Environmental Science, acquire the essential tools for understanding the complexities of national and global environmental systems.

Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art
Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art
Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

Theatre Arts I & II 
Theatre Arts is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Theatre Arts read and analyze plays, create scripts and theatre pieces, conceive scenic designs, and develop acting skills. These activities incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre, attend and critique theatrical productions, and recognize the responsibilities and the importance of individual theatre patrons in their community.

Mass Media
Mass Media, a course based on the High School Journalism Standards and the Mass Media and Media Literacy Standards, is the study of the importance of mass media as pervasive in modern life at the local, national, and global levels. It includes a study of the impact of constant and immediate news, entertainment, and persuasive messages on everyday life. Students use course content to become knowledgeable consumers of mass media in preparation for their roles as informed citizens in a democratic society. MASS MEDIA PROJECT for the second credit: Students complete a project, such as a media convergence special report using multiple formats that compare different aspects of a topic of interest or concern. The project demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in Mass Media course content. 

Contemporary Literature
Contemporary Literature, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts, is a study of how post-1950s literature from around the world, such as North and South America, Europe and Great Britain, the Middle East, and post-colonial Africa and Asia, addresses contemporary issues. Students examine multiple genres to develop a sense of how particular genres are used today to represent ideas and events. Students analyze different theories and methods of textual criticism especially theories currently popular. Students analyze how the interpretations and themes of contemporary literature read in this course relate to the time period and to historical issues.

 

10th - 12th Grades (Classes of 2016, 2017, 2018)

 

 

 

Academic and/or Technical Honors Path                                                        Core 40 Diploma Path
Freshman Year                                                                                               Freshman Year

Innovative Perspectives (English 9A & US History)                                             Innovative Perspectives (English 9A & US History)
Mathematics (Algebra or Algebra 2 Honors or double math**)                               Mathematics (Algebra)
Biology I                                                                                                          Biology I
*Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW)                                                        *Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW)
PE I & II (outside the school day)                                                                       PE I & II (outside the school day)
Spanish (I or II)                                                                                                 2 Electives (Advanced Manufacturing, Env. Science)
Elective

Sophomore Year
English 10A                                                                                                      English 10A
World History                                                                                                    World History 
*Pre-Calculus, Algebra II, or Geometry                                                                Geometry
Chemistry                                                                                                         Chemistry or Integrated Chemistry/Physics
Spanish (II or III)                                                                                                3 electives (SAT/ACT Prep, Sociology, Composition,
Elective PE                                                                                                             *Principles of Engineering)
Fine Arts classes (Theater or Visual Arts)                                                            Elective PE
Elective (SAT/ACT Prep, Sociology, Composition,                          
*Principles of Engineering)

Junior Year
English 11A                                                                                                      English 11A
*Pre-Calculus or AP Calculus                                                                             Algebra II
*Physics I                                                                                                         Chemistry, *Physics, or other Core 40 science
Spanish (III or IV) or elective                                                                              Elective
*SICTC or NTI Entrepreneurial Academy (morning)                                               *SICTC or NTI Entrepreneurial Academy (morning)

Senior Year
*English 12A (with culminating project)                                                                English 12A (with culminating project)
US Government and Economics                                                                         US Government and Economics
AP Calculus or Calculus II or Advanced Math Course                                           Trigonometry/Statistics or other Core 40 math
Advanced Level Science (*AP Physics, Env. Sci, AP Chemistry,                          Fourth year science course recommended
university)
*SICTC or NTI Entrepreneurial Academy (afternoon)                                             *SICTC or NTI Entrepreneurial Academy (afternoon)  


* Denotes concurrent college credit available              
**Double Math freshman year includes Algebra 2 Honors and Geometry Honors. 

 

NTI Course Catalog (pdf file)